What Happens If The Electoral College Votes Different?

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What Happens If The Electoral College Votes Different?

Faithless elector laws by state

In the United States Electoral College, a faithless elector is an elector who does not vote for the candidates for U.S. President and U.S. Vice President for whom the elector had pledged to vote, and instead votes for another person for one or both offices or abstains from voting.

What happens if no one gets a majority in the Electoral College?

If no candidate receives a majority of electoral votes, the House of Representatives elects the President from the three candidates who received the most electoral votes. Each state delegation has one vote. … In order to become president, a candidate must win more than half of the votes in the Electoral College.

Can Congress reject Electoral College votes?

Under the law, Congress may still reject a state’s electors if both houses decide to do so, but only when they determine either that the appointment of electors was not “lawfully certified” by the governor under the ascertainment process, or that the votes themselves were not “regularly given” by the electors.

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Can a state’s electoral votes be split?

Under the District Method, a State’s electoral votes can be split among two or more candidates, just as a state’s congressional delegation can be split among multiple political parties. As of 2008, Nebraska and Maine are the only states using the District Method of distributing electoral votes.

What three requirements must be met in order to be president of the United States?

As directed by the Constitution, a presidential candidate must be a natural born citizen of the United States, a resident for 14 years, and 35 years of age or older.

Why did Jackson call it a corrupt bargain?

Jackson, already famous for his temper, was furious. When Adams named Clay as his secretary of state, Jackson denounced the election as “the corrupt bargain.” Many assumed Clay had sold his influence to Adams so he could be secretary of state and increase his chance of being president someday.

Who composes the Electoral College?

When people cast their vote, they are actually voting for a group of people called electors. The number of electors each state gets is equal to its total number of Senators and Representatives in Congress. A total of 538 electors form the Electoral College. Each elector casts one vote following the general election.

Who is in charge of counting the votes?

No later than the 38th day after the election, the Secretary of State must determine the votes cast for candidates for state and federal office and for the statewide ballot measures, certify those results, and issue certificates of nomination/election to those candidates who were nominated/elected.

Why does California have 55 electoral votes?

There are a total of 538 electoral votes, and the number of votes each state receives is proportional to its size — the bigger the state’s population the more “votes” it gets. … For California, this means we get 55 votes (2 senators and 53 members of the House of Representatives) — the most of any state.

How does popular vote affect electoral college?

When citizens cast their ballots for president in the popular vote, they elect a slate of electors. Electors then cast the votes that decide who becomes president of the United States. Usually, electoral votes align with the popular vote in an election.

What happens if neither candidate gets 270?

What happens if no presidential candidate gets 270 electoral votes? If no candidate receives a majority of electoral votes, the Presidential election leaves the Electoral College process and moves to Congress. … The Senate elects the Vice President from the 2 Vice Presidential candidates with the most electoral votes.

Who is the youngest president to take office?

The youngest person to assume the presidency was Theodore Roosevelt, who, at the age of 42, succeeded to the office after the assassination of William McKinley. The youngest to become president by election was John F. Kennedy, who was inaugurated at age 43.

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What did the 22nd amendment do?

No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of the President more than once.

What does Section 4 of Article II talk about?

The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.

What did the national Republicans change their name to?

In the short term, it formed the Whig Party with the help of other smaller parties in a coalition against President Jackson and his reforms.

What was Henry Clay corrupt bargain?

A “corrupt bargain”

Jackson laid the blame on Clay, telling anyone who would listen that the Speaker had approached him with the offer of a deal: Clay would support Jackson in return for Jackson’s appointment of Clay as secretary of state. When Jackson refused, Clay purportedly made the deal with Adams instead.

Who benefited from accusations of a corrupt bargain?

Andrew Jackson benefited from accusations of a corrupt bargain.

What are the three powers of the president?

The Constitution explicitly assigns the president the power to sign or veto legislation, command the armed forces, ask for the written opinion of their Cabinet, convene or adjourn Congress, grant reprieves and pardons, and receive ambassadors.

How many electoral points does each state have?

Electoral College Certificates and Votes by State
State Number of Electoral Votes for Each State For President
California 55 55
Colorado 9 9
Connecticut 7 7
Delaware 3 3

How many electors does each state get?

Electoral votes are allocated among the States based on the Census. Every State is allocated a number of votes equal to the number of senators and representatives in its U.S. Congressional delegation—two votes for its senators in the U.S. Senate plus a number of votes equal to the number of its Congressional districts.

Has California governor been recalled?

2003 California gubernatorial recall election, in which Governor Gray Davis was recalled and Arnold Schwarzenegger elected in his place. …

How votes are counted in Canada?

Federal elections use hand-counted paper ballots. Provincial elections use paper ballots, some provinces have introduced computer ballot counting (vote tabulators), and the Northwest Territories has experimented with Internet voting for absentee voting.

How are votes counted Australia?

Paper ballot papers in Australian federal elections are counted by hand after the close of polling, generally in one of the approximately 7,000 polling places in which they are cast (declaration votes such as postal votes, absent votes and early votes cast outside the voter’s electorate are also counted by hand, but as …

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Is Texas a Republican state?

By the 1990s, it became the state’s dominant political party. Texas remains a majority Republican state as of 2021.

What states have the most electoral?

Currently, there are 538 electors, based on 435 representatives, 100 senators from the fifty states and three electors from Washington, D.C. The six states with the most electors are California (55), Texas (38), New York (29), Florida (29), Illinois (20), and Pennsylvania (20).

Why was the Electoral College created?

The Electoral College was created by the framers of the U.S. Constitution as an alternative to electing the president by popular vote or by Congress. … Two other presidents—Rutherford B. Hayes in 1876 and Benjamin Harrison in 1888—became president without winning the popular vote.

Why is Florida so important in the election?

In national elections, Florida plays an important role as the largest bellwether state, occasionally determining the outcome of elections for U.S. President — as it did in 1876 and in 2000.

When did the South go red?

Following the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965, Southern states became more reliably Republican in presidential politics, while Northeastern states became more reliably Democratic.

What are the swing states?

According to a pre-election 2016 analysis, the thirteen most competitive states were Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Minnesota, Arizona, Georgia, Virginia, Florida, Michigan, Nevada, Colorado, North Carolina, and Maine. Nebraska’s 2nd congressional district is also considered competitive.

Who is the poorest US President?

Truman
Truman was among the poorest U.S. presidents, with a net worth considerably less than $1 million.

List of presidents by peak net worth.
Name Donald Trump
Net worth (millions of 2016 US$) 3,100
Political party Republican
Years in office 2017–2021
Lifespan born 1946

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